SMARTPHONE HACKING - asiamediaamerica.com

Search

Go to content

Main menu:

Archive > SCIENCE-TECHNOLOGY
 


SMARTPHONE HACKING
Welcome to the new age of cybersecurity – or lack of

You’re on your smartphone, browsing through Facebook.

In a fit of productivity, you search for, say, a project management app to help you use your non-Instagram and cat video time more effectively. You download and install the first one you come across … only to find that it doesn’t do anything. No reminders, no calendar, no clock, nothing.

Oh, well. You exit the app and go back to Facebook.

Sounds innocuous enough, right?

What you might actually have done, however, is give a hacker access to your phone and all the important pieces of information it contains about you, your friends and family. And while the thief’s initial take can be relatively small compared to the kind of money he or she can make from hacking into your computer, over time, you could be leaking a lot of money without knowing it.

“The victims of these types of malware and scams could be counted in the hundreds of millions,” said Giovanni Vigna, a UC Santa Barbara professor of computer science who specializes in cybersecurity.

Smartphone hacking is one of the fastest-growing issues in terms of cybersecurity, he said, especially with the advent of cloud storage. In Europe, and increasingly in the United States, hackers are able to bypass two-stage identification, whereby a text message is sent to one’s smartphone bearing a private code for entry into account websites.

It is a problem that Vigna, computer science professor Christopher Kruegel and researchers from Northwestern University are getting ready to tackle with funding from a $1.4 million grant from the National Science Foundation.

“The thing we’ll be seeing more and more are attempts to violate trust assumptions,” said Vigna, who is a member of UC Santa Barbara’s Computer Security Group.

And what are these “trust assumptions”?

“Trust is the assurance that a certain application or platform will act as expected,” Vigna said. These are the cues, he said, that prompt the user to drop their guard and volunteer sensitive information. These cues can range from icons on pages that proclaim the authenticity of the site or the security of the download to the very recognizable logos of certain sites and apps.

“People use their phones to click on the Facebook icon, for instance, and the Facebook application starts, and they inherently assume that it’s Facebook running on their phone,” Vigna said. However, he and his team have found that users are also likely to click on a familiar icon that leads to a faux application.

The goal of these stealth attacks is to steal either your money or your information. Money is an obvious motivation, but personal information can be used to steal one’s identity or log in and exploit email or social media. Hackers leverage the trust between accounts in social networks to get the victim’s friends and contacts to click on malicious links.

Among the topics the researchers intend to study is what Vigna calls an “ecosystem of trust” unique to the smartphone world.

“There’s the guy who writes the application, benign or malicious,” said Vigna. “And then he puts it in an app store, so there’s a relationship of trust between those two. And then there’s you, the user, going to the market and downloading one or more apps, and you have some relationship of trust with those. If I’m a benign application developer and I use a certain ad framework to make money from my application, and then that ad framework starts sending malicious advertisements or links to malware, who’s responsible for this? Where’s the trust there? How do you control this trust? How can you be assured that the ad network is going to perform as stated?”

There is some comprehension of the issues, according to Vigna, but there is also a demand for more scientific modeling of these relationships and understanding of what their implications are. That way, flaws can be identified and fixed.

While the issues being studied are applicable to all smartphones, the group will examine trust in the Android world in particular.

“The main point is the tradeoff between openness and security issues. The fact is that Android is a wonderful open platform that allows anybody to do anything — including hacking the cellphones of unsuspecting Android users,” said Vigna.  The researchers hope to identify not only flaws in the system but also mechanisms to fix or avoid them. Though it’s not guaranteed, they may even develop their own app that can be used to analyze other apps’ behaviors for flaws or potential untrustworthiness.

 
 
 
Back to content | Back to main menu